May 19, 2022

South Sudan News Agency

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Vaccination is also effective for people with corona infection

Research published in The Lancet magazine confirms that vaccines provide additional protection against the serious complications of coronavirus infection, especially COVID-19, writes MTI.

Vaccines have been shown to be more effective in those who are not infected, but in recent years have been less effective in preventing the symptoms and serious side effects of those who have been previously infected – An article in The Guardian reminded him.

The Lancet Infectious Diseases Two separate studies published in the journal confirm that corona virus vaccines provide additional protection for those already infected with the Sars-CoV-2 virus, especially against serious illnesses.

According to Brazil’s first research, four vaccines – CoronaVac, Oxford / AstraZeneca, Janssen and Pfizer / BioNTech – provide additional protection against symptomatic re-infection and severe infection in those who have previously contracted the corona virus.

In a second study conducted in Sweden, the vaccine provided extra protection for those infected with the corona virus at least nine months ago.

Both studies provide important data on the effectiveness of the vaccine for previously infected patients and highlight the benefits of the vaccine, regardless of whether someone has been infected with the corona virus.

Experts say these results could help shape global vaccination strategies.

According to the first study of more than 22,000 people infected with the corona virus repeatedly, the vaccine reduced the risk of symptoms, hospitalization or death.

As Julio Grota, A scientist at the Mato Grosso do Sul Federal University in Brazil, the author of the first study, explained that there is an ongoing debate about whether to vaccinate former victims. Our results indicate that the benefits of the vaccine outweigh the potential risks and support the need for vaccination, including a complete immunization series for patients with a history of SARS-Cov-2 infection.

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In a second study of nearly 3 million people, vaccinating someone who was immunized against a previous infection reduced the risk of re-infection two months later by 58 percent. Two doses of the vaccine reduced the risk of infection by 66 percent.

The authors acknowledged the limitations of the two studies, including errors resulting from the observational nature of the research. In addition, analysis of re-infection from the Omigron variant was not included in any of the studies.